a concise summary of what you read., what is the essential information or the main points in the article? This is your “take” on the article, accompanied by supporting statements…..

se the S I T outline as your paragraph headers each time you write in your Journal:

1.       Synopsis—a concise summary of what you read., what is the essential information or the main points in the article? This is your “take” on the article, accompanied by supporting statements, facts, and other sources, of what was covered. Your synopsis should typically be at least one or two paragraphs in length (6-8 good sentences), or perhaps more, depending on each assigned reading. If you re-read this synopsis a year from now, it should tell you the essential components of the article, as well as its author, title, and date.

Avoid: commenting on, evaluating, or interacting with what you read. The synopsis is about the author(s) and the contents of the written piece, not about your opinions and observations (save this for the Interaction section).

2.      Interaction—figuratively speaking, you are to “take on” the article. . .struggle with it, wrestle with it, argue with it, using your best critical thinking and analysis skills. What were your thoughts as you read the material? Not what you think the author said, but what you thought and how you felt as you read.  What was your thinker thinking?  You are free to agree or disagree, to question, even criticize, provided you justify your opinions with reasons. You are encouraged to challenge what you read, not simply assume the author(s) has all the answers. ll this in your journal, even questions you want to raise that perhaps you do not or cannot yet answer.  Then, relate what you read to our own personal experiences. Can you tell a story? Give an example or illustration? Can you relate this article to something else you’ve read recently? What you are attempting to do is make the article relevant, and thereby take on value.

Avoid: (1) merely commenting or editorializing about the piece, then trying to pass it off as a substitute for the hard work of critical thinking—your professor knows the difference;  (2) trying to “fix the world” or “save the planet” with your insights and comments—leave all this for superheroes; (3) writing in 3rd person, using “we”, etc.  Interaction is about what you think, how you feel, and what happened for you, as you critically read the piece.

3.       Takeaway—what was the personal benefit, application, or action you plan to take based on what you read

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